Harvard University Announces Inaugural Conference

International
Harvard University announces inaugural conference

The purpose of the Matos Chair, besides honoring Mexico’s most eminent archaeologist, is to link the most outstanding pre-Hispanic Mexican specialists in the world. Through the figure of Professor Matos Moctezuma, Harvard pays homage to the – globally recognized – excellence of Mexican archeology.

Mexico City.- September 29, 2017.- Harvard University unites in solidarity with the Mexican people in these tragic moments, and reiterates its commitment to collaborate with the national academic community in search of solutions to the most pressing problems from the country. Today more than ever, Harvard is committed to interinstitutional collaboration with Mexico.

In order to renew this commitment to educational and research collaboration, Harvard University has established the Eduardo Matos Moctezuma Lecture Series, the first in almost 400 years of university history in honor of a Mexican .

The purpose of the Matos Chair, besides honoring Mexico’s most eminent archaeologist, is to link the most outstanding pre-Hispanic Mexican specialists in the world. Through the figure of Professor Matos Moctezuma, Harvard pays homage to the – globally recognized – excellence of Mexican archeology.

The inaugural lecture of the Cátedra Matos Moctezuma will take place on Tuesday, October 3, at 7:00 pm, in the Jaime Torres Bodet Auditorium of the National Museum of Anthropology. Harvard will be attended by Mark Elliott, vice-provost for International Affairs, and Mark Schwartz, professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History; Brian Farrell, director of the David Rockefeller for Latin American Studies and professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology; and David Hempton, dean of the Harvard Divinity School; Alonzo L. McDonald Family, Professor of Evangelical Theological Studies, and John Lord O’Brian, Professor of Divinity. On the part of the Government of Mexico will be present the anthropologist Diego Prieto, director general of the National Institute of Anthropology and History; Dr. Antonio Saborit, head of the National Museum of Anthropology (INAH); and the teacher Patricia Ledesma, director of the Museum of the Templo Mayor.

After the conference, the exhibition Voices of Mud will be inaugurated, selected on the occasion of the inauguration of the chair by Professor Matos himself. The exhibition brings together nine of the most important clay sculptures from the collections of the National Museum of Anthropology and the Museo del Templo Mayor. It will also be exhibited the “El Caballero Águila” artwork, which the celebrated Mexican-American artist George Yepes has made especially as a symbol for the Matos Chair, and which will serve as a visual identity for the next editions of the Chair.

The establishment of the Matos Moctezuma Chair has been possible thanks to the generosity of José Antonio Alonso Espinosa and the initiative of David Carrasco, Neil L. Rudenstine, professor for the Study of Latin America at Harvard. It is the result of a collaboration between the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, the Harvard Divinity School and the Moses Mesoamerican Archive of Harvard University. For the inaugural conference in Mexico, Harvard has received the invaluable support of the Ministry of Culture, through INAH, the National Museum of Anthropology and the Museum of the Templo Mayor.

Eduardo Matos Moctezuma is a researcher emeritus of INAH. He obtained his master’s degree in Anthropological Sciences with a specialization in Archeology at ENAH and the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). In 1978 he created the Templo Mayor Project, where five excavation seasons have been developed, and through which the Urban Archeology Program is carried out, which has carried out archaeological rescues in different places of the Historic Center of Mexico City. His teaching activity is developed mainly in the ENAH, where he teaches courses since 1968, and in the School of Restoration, Conservation and Museography “Manuel del Castillo Negrete”. Among his most outstanding publications are Death to the edge of obsidian; Life and death in the Templo Mayor; Teotihuacan, the metropolis of the gods; The Aztecs; The Templo Mayor de Tenochtitlan; The pre-Hispanic house; The stones denied; and Mexican Studies, among many others.

Professor Matos has worked, among other positions, as director of the Center for Research and Higher Studies in Social Anthropology (1982-1986); director of the National Museum of Anthropology (1986-1987); and director of the Museo del Templo Mayor (1987-2000). He is a member of the Mexican Culture Seminar, the Mexican Society of Geography and Statistics, the Mexican Society for the Study of Religions, the National Academy of History and Geography, the Mexican Academy of History, the Mexican Academy of the Language and the National College, among other institutions. Among the distinctions

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